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HAVING MORE SENIOR SUBORDINATES

January 31st, 2010 | Posted by josantamaria in Articles - (0 Comments)

I’m a newly promoted supervisor with eight people working under me.  Three of them are 5-10 years older and more senior to me in terms of number of years in the company.  It is with the latter that I feel very uncomfortable.  I don’t know how to deal with them especially when they are passive during meetings, or ask me for the basis of my decisions.

Please help me by giving me some useful how-tos.

Mr. Bagito

 

 

You feel uncomfortable dealing with these three senior employees because your being younger than they, and junior to them, is eroding your self-confidence.

The following tips may be useful to you to bolster your self-confidence:

  1. Our thoughts affect our feelings.  To develop your self-confidence in relating with your direct reports, have the following positive but true thoughts about yourself:

-        Though you are younger, you were the one chosen by management for promotion..

-        Management recognized your competencies and your track record of consistent performance.

-        Management recognized your potentials for leadership and your promotion to supervisor is an opportunity to show your leadership and to develop it further.

  1. During your meetings, encourage participation of all your eight subordinates.

-        Solicit inputs (opinions, suggestions etc.) from all of them.

-        Avoid focusing your attention on the senior employees in your desire to impress/please them.  Act naturally towards them and relate to them as you do with the others.

-        If the senior employees remain passive during meetings despite your efforts to solicit inputs from them, just let them be.

-        Before the meeting ends, summarize the points taken up and the decisions made.  If your subordinates were given a chance to voice out their opinions and suggestions, they can’t question the decisions made.  The decisions were the group’s.

You might benefit from reading materials or browsing the internet for more tips on how to handle meetings efficiently.  Added knowledge will boost your self-confidence.

3.      Learn the science and art of supervision.  Attend a company-sponsored training program on Supervision.  If there is none forthcoming, you can attend one, paid out from your own pocket.  Read a good book and/or browse the internet on supervision.  Know the technical skills of planning, organizing and controlling.  Know the emotional competencies required for effective leadership.  Practice them.  Knowing the skills and practicing them at appropriate times will boost your self-confidence.

Even experienced supervisors/managers always benefit form training and reading if they are open to learning.  Learning is continuous and life-long.

4.      You are now a supervisor, not a “super” worker.  As a supervisor, you produce results through your subordinates.  Know how each of them contributes to the outputs expected of your unit.

-        Clear with your own supervisor/manager the expected outputs/results of your unit and by when.  Know how your unit contributes to the outputs of his/her department.

-        Know how you and each of your eight subordinates contribute to your unit’s expected outputs/results.

-        Be clear about your role and the role of each of them.  Communicate these clearly to them.

-        Monitor the job performance of each one on a weekly basis.

5.      Give immediate feedback.

-        Be quick to give positive feedback for positive behaviors and for results delivered by your subordinates on schedule.  Ex:  “I like your report.  It is concise yet complete.”  When you say this, look at the person and smile.

-        Correct negative behaviors and failure to meet deadlines.  Do this in private.  There might be a tendency for you to turn a “blind eye” to the negative behaviors and failure to meet quality standards by your senior employees, out of fear or favor.  If you do this, you are showing to them that they have power over you.  Give constructive feedback in the form of reminders.  Ex:  “I’d like to remind you about minimizing the use of cellphone during office hours.”  “I want to remind you of our agreement that this report is due every Tuesday of the week.”

  1. Find time to talk to each of your subordinates to know them as workers and as persons.  Schedule a one-on-one with one person a week.  Look for the appropriate time.  Ask them how they find their work:  what they enjoy doing, what concerns they have, etc.  Look at pictures on their table.  Ask about their families. Having interactions with your employees will make you comfortable when you relate with them.
  2. Find time to coach your subordinate in areas where they need to grow.

-        Since you are a new supervisor, you may not know the responsibilities of each one.  Ask each of them what their responsibilities are and what they think of them.

-        Observe their job performance and evaluate their outputs to find out their areas for improvement and where you can coach them.

  1. To enhance your self-confidence, it is important that you give yourself a “pat on the back” each time you do the right things as a supervisor, such as being able to do any of the tips suggested above.

When you make mistakes, learn from them and do not commit them anymore.  Try not to brood over them.  Mistakes contribute to our wisdom.

Your growth and development as a supervisor can be fast-tracked if you know what knowledge and skills you need to acquire/enhance.  In this way your self-development efforts can be focused.

God bless you.

 

 

Josie O. Santamaria

MR. BAGITO

January 27th, 2010 | Posted by josantamaria in Articles - (0 Comments)

I’m a newly promoted supervisor with eight people working under me.  Three of them are 5-10 years older and more senior to me in terms of number of years in the company.  It is with the latter that I feel very uncomfortable.  I don’t know how to deal with them especially when they are passive during meetings, or ask me for the basis of my decisions.

Please help me by giving me some useful how-tos.

Mr. Bagito

 

You feel uncomfortable dealing with these three senior employees because your being younger than they, and junior to them, is eroding your self-confidence.

The following tips may be useful to you to bolster your self-confidence:

  1. Our thoughts affect our feelings.  To develop your self-confidence in relating with your direct reports, have the following positive but true thoughts about yourself:

-        Though you are younger, you were the one chosen by management for promotion..

-        Management recognized your competencies and your track record of consistent performance.

-        Management recognized your potentials for leadership and your promotion to supervisor is an opportunity to show your leadership and to develop it further.

  1. During your meetings, encourage participation of all your eight subordinates.

-        Solicit inputs (opinions, suggestions etc.) from all of them.

-        Avoid focusing your attention on the senior employees in your desire to impress/please them.  Act naturally towards them and relate to them as you do with the others.

-        If the senior employees remain passive during meetings despite your efforts to solicit inputs from them, just let them be.

-        Before the meeting ends, summarize the points taken up and the decisions made.  If your subordinates were given a chance to voice out their opinions and suggestions, they can’t question the decisions made.  The decisions were the group’s.

You might benefit from reading materials or browsing the internet for more tips on how to handle meetings efficiently.  Added knowledge will boost your self-confidence.

3.      Learn the science and art of supervision.  Attend a company-sponsored training program on Supervision.  If there is none forthcoming, you can attend one, paid out from your own pocket.  Read a good book and/or browse the internet on supervision.  Know the technical skills of planning, organizing and controlling.  Know the emotional competencies required for effective leadership.  Practice them.  Knowing the skills and practicing them at appropriate times will boost your self-confidence.

Even experienced supervisors/managers always benefit form training and reading if they are open to learning.  Learning is continuous and life-long.

4.      You are now a supervisor, not a “super” worker.  As a supervisor, you produce results through your subordinates.  Know how each of them contributes to the outputs expected of your unit.

-        Clear with your own supervisor/manager the expected outputs/results of your unit and by when.  Know how your unit contributes to the outputs of his/her department.

-        Know how you and each of your eight subordinates contribute to your unit’s expected outputs/results.

-        Be clear about your role and the role of each of them.  Communicate these clearly to them.

-        Monitor the job performance of each one on a weekly basis.

5.      Give immediate feedback.

-        Be quick to give positive feedback for positive behaviors and for results delivered by your subordinates on schedule.  Ex:  “I like your report.  It is concise yet complete.”  When you say this, look at the person and smile.

-        Correct negative behaviors and failure to meet deadlines.  Do this in private.  There might be a tendency for you to turn a “blind eye” to the negative behaviors and failure to meet quality standards by your senior employees, out of fear or favor.  If you do this, you are showing to them that they have power over you.  Give constructive feedback in the form of reminders.  Ex:  “I’d like to remind you about minimizing the use of cellphone during office hours.”  “I want to remind you of our agreement that this report is due every Tuesday of the week.”

  1. Find time to talk to each of your subordinates to know them as workers and as persons.  Schedule a one-on-one with one person a week.  Look for the appropriate time.  Ask them how they find their work:  what they enjoy doing, what concerns they have, etc.  Look at pictures on their table.  Ask about their families. Having interactions with your employees will make you comfortable when you relate with them.
  2. Find time to coach your subordinate in areas where they need to grow.

-        Since you are a new supervisor, you may not know the responsibilities of each one.  Ask each of them what their responsibilities are and what they think of them.

-        Observe their job performance and evaluate their outputs to find out their areas for improvement and where you can coach them.

  1. To enhance your self-confidence, it is important that you give yourself a “pat on the back” each time you do the right things as a supervisor, such as being able to do any of the tips suggested above.

When you make mistakes, learn from them and do not commit them anymore.  Try not to brood over them.  Mistakes contribute to our wisdom.

Your growth and development as a supervisor can be fast-tracked if you know what knowledge and skills you need to acquire/enhance.  In this way your self-development efforts can be focused.

God bless you.

 

Josie O. Santamaria

IMPATIENT FOR PROMOTION

January 10th, 2010 | Posted by josantamaria in Articles - (0 Comments)

I graduated two years ago, with honors, from a very good university.  I’ve been fortunate to have been working since then in a great company where I like the people and they like me, too, and I get a good compensation package.  I know I want to build my career here in my company now.

About six months ago, I was told confidentially by the boss of my boss that I’m one of the high potential young people.  His parting words to me were “You have a great future here in the company.”  You can just imagine how happy and excited this made me feel!

Since then, I’ve been expecting that I’d be receiving training and development programs to prepare me for a good position “up” there.  Nothing of this sort has happened.  What shall I do?  I’m embarrassed to go to my boss’ boss to ask him what I should do to be promoted for fear that I’d be giving him the impression that I’m impatient (although in reality I am).  Some of my peers in the university are now occupying supervisory/managerial positions.  I’m in a quandary.  Please advise me what I should do now.

Mr. In A Quandary

 

 

I can see that you need to manage your expectations so that your impatience will not give the wrong signals to your superiors and to your peers.  In fact your impatience can even affect your productivity now because your mind is focused on the future such that you may be neglecting some areas in your current work that needs your quality time.

Being told by the boss of your boss that you are a “high potential young person” has given you a confidence boost and you are now disappointed that nothing is being done to prepare you for the next level.

I suggest that you stop comparing yourself with your peers because it will only make you bitter or vain.  Also, that you stop looking at other pastures to see if the grass is greener there.  In reality you don’t know the working conditions and the culture in other organizations.  You yourself said that you like the people in the company and they like you in return, and that you are getting a good compensation package.

Since you’ve been in your current job in the company for only two years you should concentrate on doing a great job and learning as much as you can..  This requires that you —

  • know the standards of each task required by your current position so that you can exert efforts to exceed these standards;
  • know your boss’ expectations of you.  To do this requires that you get regular feedback from him on what you are doing right and what you need to improve on;
  • are able to manage your position’s workload as  agreed on with your boss;
  • are able to work well with others in your team and you are able to build rapport with your internal customers, i.e. your co-employees who need your inputs and with your fellow team members whose inputs you need for your outputs ;
  • sharpen your analytical skills to be able to handle problems effectively
  • enhance your communication skills  (written and oral).
  • acquire mastery of technical skills needed in your current job;
  • etc.

Your career goal must be clear to you and this must be stated in SMART terms, i.e. specific, measureable, attainable, relevant to your values, and time bound.  An example of a SMART goal:  I want to be successful in a sales career.  By the end of 2011, I’m occupying the position of District Sales Manager and performing and doing the function of this position according to standards.  After having a clear career goal, you can take a risk by going to your boss to ask him if he thinks that your career goal is realistic and if he agrees with it.  To do this requires that you wait for the “psychological moment”, perhaps during your boss’ performance appraisal of you when he/she discusses with you areas for improvement and your developmental needs.

If you find your boss receptive to your career goal, you can ask him for help in identifying the competencies you need to develop for your advancement to the next level.  He can even offer to be your mentor in his area of expertise.  Don’t ask him to be your mentor;  let him volunteer.

Perhaps you can find the “psychological moment” also to talk with your boss’ boss to thank him for considering you a “high potential young person” and about having told you that you had “a great future in the company”.  You can perhaps ask him what he thinks would be your career path in the company and what you need to do to develop and improve on so that you can match the job requirements.

It’s desirable to have a career goal so that you can have focus and your self-development efforts have a direction.  Don’t wait for the company to put you in training and development programs.  Initiate you own development thru the following:

  • enroll in training programs offered in-house or in public seminars, even funded from your own pocket;
  • be alert to cross posting assignments that may be offered to you.  This will enable you to broaden your work experience and acquire more skills;
  • accept additional workload or additional assignments given to you, if you can reasonably tackle them.  This will reflect well on your positive attitudes as well as a source of additional learnings;
  • observe the work behaviors and attitudes of successful employees in your company including your own boss and your boss’ boss.  They are your role models;
  • be open to coaching by your boss and express appreciation for his time in doing so.

God bless you.

 

Josie O. Santamaria

January 07, 2010

 

MR. JORGE G. SANTAMARIA

CAREER SYSTEMS INC.

Suite 2103 Cityland Pasong Tamo Tower

2210 Don Chino Roces Avenue

Makati City

 

 

 

Dear Mr. Santamaria,

With deep esteem and admiration, allow me to congratulate you and The Career Systems Inc. in celebrating your 25th Anniversary on January 21, 2010.  This milestone marked and sealed your continuous contribution not only in improving one’s knowledge, skills and professionalism but a priceless contribution to the pharmaceutical industry as a whole.

True to its form and substance, DMDP had shaped and influenced my actions and decisions being one of its early graduates.

DMDP will definitely hone, sharpen and unleash the potentials of anyone who dare to apply the principles and learnings from its proven record of successful graduates.

Again, congratulations and more power!

 

 

 

GERMAN A. PANGHULAN

President & General Manger

Corbridge Group Philippines | Kaufmann Pharma, Inc.

MR. IN A QUANDRY

January 6th, 2010 | Posted by josantamaria in Articles - (0 Comments)

I graduated two years ago, with honors, from a very good university.  I’ve been fortunate to have been working since then in a great company where I like the people and they like me, too, and I get a good compensation package.  I know I want to build my career here in my company now.

About six months ago, I was told confidentially by the boss of my boss that I’m one of the high potential young people.  His parting words to me were “You have a great future here in the company.”  You can just imagine how happy and excited this made me feel!

Since then, I’ve been expecting that I’d be receiving training and development programs to prepare me for a good position “up” there.  Nothing of this sort has happened.  What shall I do?  I’m embarrassed to go to my boss’ boss to ask him what I should do to be promoted for fear that I’d be giving him the impression that I’m impatient (although in reality I am).  Some of my peers in the university are now occupying supervisory/managerial positions.  I’m in a quandary.  Please advise me what I should do now.

Mr. In A Quandary

 

 

I can see that you need to manage your expectations so that your impatience will not give the wrong signals to your superiors and to your peers.  In fact your impatience can even affect your productivity now because your mind is focused on the future such that you may be neglecting some areas in your current work that needs your quality time.

Being told by the boss of your boss that you are a “high potential young person” has given you a confidence boost and you are now disappointed that nothing is being done to prepare you for the next level.

I suggest that you stop comparing yourself with your peers because it will only make you bitter or vain.  Also, that you stop looking at other pastures to see if the grass is greener there.  In reality you don’t know the working conditions and the culture in other organizations.  You yourself said that you like the people in the company and they like you in return, and that you are getting a good compensation package.

Since you’ve been in your current job in the company for only two years you should concentrate on doing a great job and learning as much as you can..  This requires that you —

  • know the standards of each task required by your current position so that you can exert efforts to exceed these standards;
  • know your boss’ expectations of you.  To do this requires that you get regular feedback from him on what you are doing right and what you need to improve on;
  • are able to manage your position’s workload as  agreed on with your boss;
  • are able to work well with others in your team and you are able to build rapport with your internal customers, i.e. your co-employees who need your inputs and with your fellow team members whose inputs you need for your outputs ;
  • sharpen your analytical skills to be able to handle problems effectively
  • enhance your communication skills  (written and oral).
  • acquire mastery of technical skills needed in your current job;
  • etc.

Your career goal must be clear to you and this must be stated in SMART terms, i.e. specific, measureable, attainable, relevant to your values, and time bound.  An example of a SMART goal:  I want to be successful in a sales career.  By the end of 2011, I’m occupying the position of District Sales Manager and performing and doing the function of this position according to standards.  After having a clear career goal, you can take a risk by going to your boss to ask him if he thinks that your career goal is realistic and if he agrees with it.  To do this requires that you wait for the “psychological moment”, perhaps during your boss’ performance appraisal of you when he/she discusses with you areas for improvement and your developmental needs.

If you find your boss receptive to your career goal, you can ask him for help in identifying the competencies you need to develop for your advancement to the next level.  He can even offer to be your mentor in his area of expertise.  Don’t ask him to be your mentor;  let him volunteer.

Perhaps you can find the “psychological moment” also to talk with your boss’ boss to thank him for considering you a “high potential young person” and about having told you that you had “a great future in the company”.  You can perhaps ask him what he thinks would be your career path in the company and what you need to do to develop and improve on so that you can match the job requirements.

It’s desirable to have a career goal so that you can have focus and your self-development efforts have a direction.  Don’t wait for the company to put you in training and development programs.  Initiate you own development thru the following:

  • enroll in training programs offered in-house or in public seminars, even funded from your own pocket;
  • be alert to cross posting assignments that may be offered to you.  This will enable you to broaden your work experience and acquire more skills;
  • accept additional workload or additional assignments given to you, if you can reasonably tackle them.  This will reflect well on your positive attitudes as well as a source of additional learnings;
  • observe the work behaviors and attitudes of successful employees in your company including your own boss and your boss’ boss.  They are your role models;
  • be open to coaching by your boss and express appreciation for his time in doing so.

God bless you.

 

Josie O. Santamaria